GOAL | 03 | Good Health and Well-being

Sustainable Development Goal 3 aims to ensure health and well-being for all at all ages by improving reproductive, maternal and child health; ending the epidemics of major communicable diseases; reducing non-communicable and environmental diseases; achieving universal health coverage; and ensuring access to safe, affordable and effective medicines and vaccines for all.

  • Some 89 per cent of births were delivered by skilled health personnel in 2015.
  • Indonesia’s maternal mortality ratio was equal to 305 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births according to the 2015 Intercensal Population Survey (SUPAS).
  • The under-five mortality rate was 40 deaths per 1,000 live births during the period 2008–2012. Nearly half of all under-five deaths occur during the neonatal period – in the first four weeks of life.
  • The national immunization coverage for the third dose of diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus vaccine (DPT3) was 74 per cent in 2015. Protection against measles was somewhat higher, reaching 82 per cent of infants 12–23 months old.
  • Nearly half of children (47 per cent) were covered by health insurance programmes in 2015. The National Health Insurance Programme (JKN) aims to extend financial coverage for health care to at least 95 per cent of the population by 2019.

Good Health and Well-being

What this goal is about

Sustainable Development Goal 3 aims to ensure health and well-being for all at all ages by improving reproductive, maternal and child health; ending the epidemics of major communicable diseases; reducing non-communicable and environmental diseases; achieving universal health coverage; and ensuring access to safe, affordable and effective medicines and vaccines for all.

Despite significant gains in maternal and child health, the global under-five mortality rate is still at 43 per 1,000 live births. Empowering adolescent girls through raising awareness and providing access to sexual and reproductive health services is critical to helping delay childbearing and to reducing unintended pregnancies. While communicable diseases are on the decline, non-communicable diseases are a leading cause of mortality and morbidity.

Many countries are grappling with a double burden of communicable and non-communicable disease. Globally, there is an increasing awareness of the heavy personal, social and economic costs of substance-use disorders and poor mental health. These various health challenges impact on children both directly and indirectly.

Indonesia is ahead of global averages in under-five mortality rates, and has limited the spread of communicable diseases. However, more investment is required to eliminate preventable maternal and child death. At the same time, Indonesia’s rapidly changing urban landscape brings new challenges in terms of a range of non-communicable diseases for both children and adults.

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Good Health and Well Being

Key statistics & figures

Children born in the poorest households were three times more likely to die before age 5 than children from the richest households
Under-five mortality rate for the 10-year period preceding the survey, by wealth quintile, 2012

Source: IDHS 2012

Children in rural households are least likely to benefit from routine immunization services
Percentage of children aged 12–23 months who received specific vaccines at any time before the survey, by selected characteristics, 2015

Source: SUSENAS 2015

Skilled birth attendance
Percentage of births attended by skilled health personnel, by province, 2015

Note: The indicator refers to ever-married women who had a live birth in the two years preceding the SUSENAS attended by obstetricians, midwives, nurses or other health professionals.

Source: SUSENAS 2015

A child’s immunization status is strongly associated with its place of residence
Percentage of children aged 12–23 months who received specific vaccines at any time before the survey, by province, 2015

Note: All basic vaccination is measured by coverage of BCG (bacille Calmette-Guérin TB vaccine), Polio4 (four doses of polio vaccine), DPT3 (third dose of DPT vaccine), HepB3 (third dose of hepatitis B vaccine) and MMR (measles, mumps and rubella vaccine).

Source: SUSENAS 2015

Close to half of children were covered by health insurance in 2015
Percentage of children covered by health insurance programmes, by selected background characteristics, 2015

Source: SUSENAS 2015